Ubar – Lost City

Home > Dhofar > Ubar – Lost City

a fabled lost city

This fabled lost city, also known as the Atlantis of the Sands, is tucked away in the Rub Al Khali (Empty Quarter) and rumoured to have been found near the oasis of Shisr. Ubar once played a vital role as frankincense trade hub and was mentioned in “A Thousand and One Nights” -a  collection of Middle Eastern and South Asian stories and folk tales.

In February 1992, the New York Times announced a major archaeological discovery in the following terms: “Guided by ancient maps and sharp-eyed surveys from space, archaeologists and explorers have discovered a lost city deep in the sands of Arabia, and they are virtually sure it is Ubar, the fabled entrepôt of the rich frankincense trade thousands of years ago.”

More Places To See

  • All
  • A’Dakhiliyah
  • A’Dhahirah
  • A’Sharqiyah
  • A’Sharqiyah North
  • A’Sharqiyah South
  • Al Batinah
  • Al Batinah North
  • Al Batinah South
  • Al Buraimi
  • Al Wusta
  • Dhofar
  • Musandam
  • Muscat

Things to do

Interested in a particular type of holiday experience? there is so much to do in Oman that you will want to keep coming back. Here are just a few of the possibilities to help make your next visit to Oman perfect.

Heritage and crafts Omani man doing pottery design Oman

Heritage & Crafts

Oman has always placed great importance on the preservation of its heritage and traditional craftsmanship. Handed down through generations, craftwork is still practiced according to old traditions and with a modern twist by Omani artisans across the Sultanate.

Dining special

Dining

Whether it is tasty street food or fine dining, visitors to Oman will find a wide range of options to suit all tastes. From contemporary restaurants serving all types of international cuisine in hotels, resorts, malls and commercial areas, to the casual shawarma eateries and coffee shops, the possibilities are endless.

Camel riding at Wahiba Sands

Camel Riding

Historically, camels were used by local Bedouins for transporting goods and people through the desert and around the country. Today, owning camels has become more a sign of prestige, with many Omanis breeding them for racing and beauty contests.