Wadi Dayqah Dam

Home > Muscat > Wadi Dayqah Dam

An amazing picnic area

Wadi Dayqah Dam is one of the largest on the Arabian Peninsula and a source of irrigation and protection for the surrounding villages, as it reduces the number of flash floods in the area. A picnic area has been built atop the dam with great views for all to enjoy.

Wadi Dayqah Dam is quite a spectacular sight!

Set in the rugged limestone Wadi (valley) this huge construction is a real contrast of natural Omani beauty and impressive human engineering.

Opened in 2012 the dam was built to collect the periodic rain fall from the high peaks above and control the volume of water flowing through the narrow torrent, ‘dayqah’, to the villages below. This still maintains the ancient “Falaj” irrigation system whilst controlling the surges of water rolling off the hillside.

The dam is quite a spectacle for Oman and is by far the highest in the country. The water lake is 8 kilometres (5 miles) long and can hold 100 million cubic meters of rain water.

More Places To See

  • All
  • A’Dakhiliyah
  • A’Dhahirah
  • A’Sharqiyah
  • A’Sharqiyah North
  • A’Sharqiyah South
  • Al Batinah
  • Al Batinah North
  • Al Batinah South
  • Al Buraimi
  • Al Wusta
  • Dhofar
  • Musandam
  • Muscat

Things to do

Interested in a particular type of holiday experience? there is so much to do in Oman that you will want to keep coming back. Here are just a few of the possibilities to help make your next visit to Oman perfect.

Geology Mountainous Region

Geology

Looking back on a geological history spanning across millions of years, Oman is one of the few places that carries its unique geological heritage on the open. Attractions such as Jebel Shams, or the Ophiolite rocks surrounding Muttrah Corniche, were once at the bottom of the ocean.

Wildlife Watching 005 1

Wildlife Watching

If you have ever witnessed endangered Green Turtle babies hatch and try to make their way to the water, you will know what a special experience it is. Oman remains dedicated to enabling these kind of wildlife encounters while protecting the animals.

Wadi Shuwaymiyah Dhofar

Wadis

Wadis are dry riverbeds or small valleys. Some have stunning water pools, fed by natural springs, and a backdrop of rugged mountains. Others are framed by date and fruit plantations that to this day are tended by locals using traditional falaj or waterways.